WordPress: It’s a great CMS

So, WordPress.

Depending on the day, it’s the smile on my face or the knot on my brow. It’s probably the simplest thing I’ve ever monkeyed with behind the curtain and, yet, it’s insanely complex.

According to those who know, it’s a lousy content management system. And yet, I have to disagree. It’s got some limitations, to be sure, but I’ve found it to be remarkably malleable, bending itself to many of the tasks I’ve thrown at it.

But I’m getting ahead of myself. Because just a few months ago, I was very much a WordPress n00b, thinking that “customizing” meant ticking off the options on the expensive (and! virally! marketed!) theme I applied to this blog a year ago.

That was before I grew to understand the magic in a publishing platform for which you merely had to type into Google “Whatever crazy feature you’d like your site to have” and “WordPress plugin.”

But again, I’m rushing ahead. First comes the framework.

As Andy Ihnatko said the other day:

Forget about finding a WordPress theme that looks like it’s just a few tweaks and styles away from what I want. Instead, I’ll start with an utterly blank theme with every piece of WP infrastructure I’ll need, and use it as the starting point.

So here’s where I am right now: I’ve downloaded and installed the K2 theme. There are a couple of (old) tutorials on customizing it, and I’ll prolly be dipping deep into that well.

What’s the worst that can happen? The worst that can happen is that I learn something.

That’s been my mantra as I try to push and prod WordPress into a CMS: What’s the worst that can happen? Is trial-and-error the best way to teach myself PHP? Probably not. But as long as I pay close attention and make a copy of my files as I go along, the worst thing is, as Andy says, I pick up a little more knowledge along with the bruises.

So, sporadically, I’ll be sharing what I’ve found and, more often than not, begging for help out of a bind.

But know this: I believe WordPress is a great CMS.

Tim Windsor